“The Cuckoo’s Egg:” An Old Story – New to Me

Two weekends ago I finished reading “Tribe of Hackers: Cybersecurity Advice from the Best Hackers in the World”. (Please read previous blog entry to learn more.) I was amazed at how many of “Tribe of Hackers” contributors recommended an old book, “The Cuckoo’s Egg: Tracking a Spy Through the Maze of Computer Espionage,” which was written by Clifford Stoll in 1989.

The story actually begins at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 1986. I won’t go into too many details about the setting or the time. In computer years, it was ages ago. So my question: “How could such an old book about tracking down a hacker be so routinely recommended by a slew of highly knowledgeable and well-respected info sec professionals?”

Turns out cybersecurity hasn’t changed much. In “The Cuckoo’s Egg,” the hacker who is being tracked by Stoll, an astronomer, is aided by of the following: 1) default credentials, 2) processes that run as root, but shouldn’t, 3) well-known vulnerabilities, 4) the fact that folks can be fooled into entering their credentials into fake sites, 5) the desire of organizations to not share information, 6) the fact that various US agencies described this sort of attack as not their ‘bailiwick’, 7) the fact that various agencies don’t have the expertise to fully comprehend the risk to their data and network infrastructures, and 8) that organizations could not possibly imagine someone actually penetrating their ‘high security’ environments. I’m sure I’m missing a few, but you get the idea.

Besides being a great old book, published when I was a curious, modem tapping, BBS surfing adolescent, it’s an excellent primer on the foundations of modern cybersecurity. Sure, the technology has changed, but fundamentals haven’t moved an inch. Maybe all cybersecurity professionals have heard of this book except for me, but if you haven’t, consider reading it. Even if you’re not after the education, it’s wonderfully entertaining.

“Tribe of Hackers” Wins the Day

It’s weird how I found out about “Tribe of Hackers: Cybersecurity Advice from the Best Hackers in the World”. I saw a photo on Twitter of a fellow Luther Collage alum, Ben Tomhave, showing that he was featured as one of the ‘tribe’. “What’s this about?” I asked myself.

As it turned out, this was a book soon to be released by Threatcare, a firm that is an active, generous purveyor of learning and community building in cybersecurity.

I love books and learning learning, and I’m relatively new to cybersecurity. Though I would hazard to guess that a majority of people in this field feel like they are ‘relatively new’. For people like me, books like this are pure gold. (I can’t say I’ve read many books like this one, however.)

Jeshua with books.

The crowning glory of this recent publication is thought-diversity. (Yes, I just hyphenated those two words together.) You can read a chapter by one contributor who says that ‘user security awareness’ is the biggest bang-for-the-buck toward improving organizational security. The next will say ‘asset inventory’. I love this.

The bang-for-your-buck question is just one simple example. There is a WHOLE LOT more going on in this book than that. It’s loaded with practical advice on building your career, getting along with others, and learning from your mistakes. Sure there is a lot varying ideas, but they all lead to a few core truths. One of these core truths is that cybersecurity is all about PEOPLE. That is even if you like the term ‘cyber’ which one author explains ‘holds no real meaning any more’. I love this too.

This collection of industry wisdom is a rare find. Hats off to Marcus J. Carey and Jennifer Lin and all the contributors who had the fortitude to put these reflections down on paper for people like me. 🙂 “Tribe of Hackers” wins the day! Check it out: https://www.threatcare.com/tribe-of-hackers/

Postman API Learning, Testing, and Development

I’m pretty late into to the API game. Recently I was on a call with a handful of security engineers and they explained that they couldn’t afford to have their people staring at console screens any more. Instead, they rely almost entirely on API’s to automate and streamline their work. I’ve been hearing about API development forever but I’d not gotten past the first hurdle: how to start. My answer to this is Postman.

Once you have an API you want to consume, you can start doing ‘POST’ and ‘GET’ requests pronto and see results immediately. Also, one critical tipping point for me was when I watched a number of the introductory videos that Postman provides. For example, I didn’t understand what the ‘Test’ section was for. The videos demonstrated that this is where you can write JavaScript to traverse the JSON files which are the results of your requests.

Currently, I’m only using a free account. I’m in learning mode, but as I move toward doing more work with API’s in the future, I’ll absolutely be using Postman to test and verify my efforts. It’s also a great introduction in the security advantages and disadvantages of using API’s.

Anyone else who has a desire to dig into API’s and consider what they can do to add value to your work, try Postman. And don’t forget to check out a few of their tutorial videos.